Category : Modern Greek History

The best museums of Athens

The best museums of Athens

You can come to Athens and not spend a single hour indoors. But these are the top 5 reasons you should not:

Acropolis Museum

Built to fulfill the need for a space that can accommodate all the great exhibits that were found on and around the Acropolis rock, it is not named “New Acropolis Museum” by accident. Delivered in the summer of 2009, it is the third museum built for this purpose as the first two –much smaller ones- got full pretty quickly. Soon after the liberation from the Turks, Greeks started to excavate, salvage, collect and restore whatever Acropolis antiquities had not been destroyed – or carried away – during the Ottoman rule.

Pikionis’ Athens

Pikionis’ Athens

A visit to Acropolis is somehow “mandatory” during a visit to Athens, but the long walk up and around this rock is an almost equally rewarding experience. Of course, the area surrounding the Acropolis and the Filopapou hill (facing across it from the southwest) has not always looked as it does today. It was transformed to the landscape you can currently see by one of the most ingenious and influential Greek architects, Dimitrios Pikionis (1887-1968), between 1954 and 1958.

How to coffee like a Greek

How to coffee like a Greek

Warning Note: Always specify the level of sweetness you prefer; “Sweet” or “Glikos”, as it is pronounced, means (usually) 2 teaspoons of coffee and 4 teaspoons of sugar. Medium or “Metrios” means 2 teaspoons of coffee and 2 teaspoons of sugar). Plain or no sugar or “Sketos” means 2 teaspoons of coffee and no sugar. And no, it is not easy to add as much sugar as you want later cause of the foam and the fact that the ice cubes will make it hard for the sugar to be dissolved.

The story of “OHI” day

The story of “OHI” day

If you happen to be in Greece on the 28th of October, you might notice Greek flags waving from balconies, closed shops and military parades on the main streets. Now don’t be scared, this is (hopefully) not a coup, it is just the celebration of the national ‘OHI’ day of Greece.

The 28th of October is celebrated as a national day of pride in Greece, mostly referred to as “OHI” (NO) day. It commemorates the anniversary when former military general and Greek Prime Minister Ioannis Metaxas said, “No” to an ultimatum made by Italian Prime Minister Benito Mussolini to allow Italian forces to occupy Greece or otherwise face war back in 1940.